Women, men and software — Alexander Serebrenik

Some people (men) wonder why women do not participate in StackOverflow. Alexander was interested in this topic, so he tried to figure out what exactly was going on. Of course, in an automated way. Some people have names which are relatively easy to match to a gender, like Gunter. This is sometimes local, Andrea is Read more about Women, men and software — Alexander Serebrenik[…]

Towards explanation-oriented introductory programming — Julian Jabs

The research area of introductory programming mainly focuses on small scale exploratory studies, but there is a need for larger scale studies. Amen to that, of course! Julian’s goal is to help language designers (with a prescriptive theory) to design introductory programming languages. Proposal 1: we need to learn from explanation-oriented programming (EOP) by Erwig and Walkenshaw. Read more about Towards explanation-oriented introductory programming — Julian Jabs[…]

Getting started with C++ as a high-level programmer

This is a cool talk by Samathy Barrett (@samathy_baratt) on concepts of C++ for “normal people” 🙂 Because there are so many people are writing code in high-level languages (Sam says: Ruby, Python, JavaScript and Visual Basic), what can we learn from C++? (any why do we have to) First why: C and C++ are Read more about Getting started with C++ as a high-level programmer[…]

Human language and its role in reference-point errors — Craig S. Miller

What type of errors to novice programmers make? We have talked about that A LOT this week. How fabulous. Craig is going to talk about what underlying psychological phenomena might be there. An example: Open the ice cream and serve two scoops That is easy to do, but… what you mean is open the container Read more about Human language and its role in reference-point errors — Craig S. Miller[…]

Programming languages: Thinking the unthinkable — Tomas Petricek

Tomas is going to talk about Michel Foucault! Wow! From a book (missed the title) comes this excerpt: The idea here is incommensurability, or as Foucault calls it episteme: the idea that two theories do not share a basis that would allow evaluating them using a common metric. There are a few other forms of this as well, Read more about Programming languages: Thinking the unthinkable — Tomas Petricek[…]